• ISO Speed Rating: 400
  • Grain: Unique Fine
  • Film Type: BW (Black and White)
  • Process: Tmax developer, XTOL, Standard Black & White Chemistry
  • Sharpness: High
  • Remarks: Panchromatic, black-and-white, excellent tone gradation, brilliant highlights, depth of field, fast shutter speeds, extends distance range of flash, fast action subjects, dimly-lit subjects, low-flare interior lighting, portraiture with low-contrast backlighting outdoors, general.

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  • ISO Speed Rating: 400
  • Grain: Unique Fine
  • Film Type: BW (Black and White)
  • Process: Tmax developer, XTOL, Standard Black & White Chemistry
  • Sharpness: High
  • Remarks: Panchromatic, black-and-white, excellent tone gradation, brilliant highlights, depth of field, fast shutter speeds, extends distance range of flash, fast action subjects, dimly-lit subjects, low-flare interior lighting, portraiture with low-contrast backlighting outdoors, general.

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Oriental Seagull 400 Black & White FilmOriental Seagull 400 Black & White FilmOriental Seagull 400 Black & White Film
 It was in late in
February of this year that I learned that Oriental Seagull was coming out with some 35mm film. The film is offered in both ISO 100 and 400. Film photographers all over the world were happy to learn about this bu
t several questions arose from this… Will it be easily available worldwide? and is it truly a new film or a rebranded one?
Weeks passed by without hearing anything else about this
new film but in mid-march I saw a link that brought me on the Facebook page of Camera Film Photo and that’s when I learned that they had a limited quantity of the Oriental Seagull 35mm film. I immediately contacted the fine folks at Camera Film Photo to learn that they offered International shipping. So I placed my small order in for 3 rolls of the 400 ISO film.
Shipping was extremely fast (I live in Canada). I got the package in 7 days!
I’m a medium format film photographers, I only shoot 35mm from time to time, so it took me a while to finish at least 2 rolls of this film.
I mostly shoot portraits in natural light. The portraits were made using a Pentax K1000 SE with a smc Pentax 55mm f/1.8 prime lens
The moon photo was made using a Nikon FG camera on a Lunt Eng. 70mm refractor telescope (420mm focal lenght + 2.5x barlow lens for an effective focal lenght of 1050mm)
All other shots were made with the Nikon FG with a 28-70mm f/2.8 Tokina lens.

 Oriental Seagull 400 Black & White Film

I processed the two rolls in my favorite developer, Rodinal. I used a dilution ratio of 1+25 as recommended by my good friends at Camera Film Photo at a temperature of 20 degrees Celcius for 7.5 minutes. Overall, I’m pleased with the results. I find the grain of this film similar to Tri-X but not as sharp. I still haven’t printed some photos in the darkroom yet but that will come soon. Photos supplied here were scanned with an Epson V500 Photo wich is far from being the best for 35mm film but at least it gives you a good idea 🙂
Oriental Seagull 400 Black & White Film
Oriental Seagull 400 Black & White Film
Oriental Seagull 400 Black & White FilmOriental Seagull 400 Black & White FilmOriental Seagull 400 Black & White Film
Is this rebranded film? The box of the film as no ”Made in” mention on it so it’s hard to tell. The only other 400 ISO black and white film that requires the same recipe (Rodinal 1+25 for 7.5 min.) are Fortepan 400, Kentmere 400 and Ultrafine Xtreme 400. I did shot some Kentmere 400 in the past so I compared both strips. The frame counts are identical (blue circles) and some codes (red circles) are of the same style (see photo). So my conclusion is that there are good chances that this Oriental Seagull 400 film is in fact Kentmere 400 wich is manufactured by Ilford.
As of this writing, I believe that this film is not sold yet in North America so I’m very happy that Camera Film Photo is offering some. Try it out and share your results!!!
Gaetan Cormier is a film photographer from Montreal, Canada
You can visit is website at www.cormierphotography.ca
Be advised that the website contains some art nude photography



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Designer Peter Barwick, above.

 

As a designer, Peter Barwick is constantly scanning everything around him, from typography to composition to colors and shapes.  This is turn has had an effect on the way he has approached photography over the years.  According to Barwick: “Being limited to 12, 24 or 36 images on a roll of film you have to slow down and think about the composition of the image you’ll be shooting.  Some of the images come about when you least expect it.  For example in the above image I noticed a shaft of light on the wall beside my friend Mick’s ’50 Mercury. I set up my Mamiya C330 on a tripod to take a shot of Mick siting on his car with this wonderful shaft of light.  Then we switched positions.  In the next photo Mick pressed the shutter release.  The zipper on my jumper was in focus.  My face wasn’t.  Oh, well.  Such are the pleasures of life!”

 

 

In his current role as a Global Packaging Design Consultant based in Switzerland, Barwick has never forgotten his love for shooting film.   “I’ve been lucky in that I’ve had the opportunity to use film cameras from an early age, rather than only using digital.”  Barwick has several classic cameras in his collection.  Take for example his Hasselblad 500C, Leica M6, M9-P and R8, Mamiya C330, RB67, 7II, Widelux and Xpan.  Out shooting, Barwick tries to keep it simple and his “simple” images are a delight!
Peter Barwick-1-8x8@110
– Dancing at the Goodwood Revival, Sussex,UK, above.
As with photography, Barwick’s love of the automobile has been part of his life for many years and he has purchased and driven many wonderful classic cars (at the last count almost 100 since buying his first car in his early 20’s). He has some great stories from his many road trips, from buying a ’57 Cadillac from a beautiful red head and ending up in her pool, to driving coast to coast in a ’59 Lincoln Continental, ’68 Oldsmobile convertible, and ’68 Dodge Coronet 440. He has found many classic cars in old barns, and upon meeting a gas station attendant in Arizona, was offered a ’50 Chevy pickup, which he couldn’t refuse, despite having already purchased an old Oldsmobile convertible, ’66 Dodge Charger and ’59 Cadillac Coupe de Ville during the same two week road trip.
The unique ‘Goodwood Revival’ event in Sussex, UK, combines Barwick’s love of design, classic cars, motorbikes and vintage aeroplanes by celebrating motor racing as it used to be with all the glamour of the era. Competitors and spectators alike dress up in period fashions, with the finest sights and entertainment of the pre ’66 era for all to enjoy. For this 3 day event Barwick kept with the vintage theme and used his vintage Mamiya C330 with Koday Tri-X film.  Event participation is by advance ticketing only (www.goodwood.com).

Peter Barwick-2-8x8@110

 

– Goodwood’s participants dress up in period garb from the 40s, 50s, and 60s, a photographer’s dream, above.

 

Peter Barwick-3-8x8@110

 

– The Jaguar above is just one of the many splendid vintage classic cars on display and racing around the Goodwood race circuit.

 

Peter Barwick-5-8x8@110

 

– Action at the races, from the pit lane to the the start/finish line at the Goodwood Revival, above and below.

Peter Barwick-4-8x8@110

 

For more information see: www.peterbarwick.com

Images contained in this blog post copyright Peter Barwick ©.